Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt: Conceptual Color in Print

October 17, 2009March 7, 2010

Donald Judd was a major figure in the Minimalist art movement in the 1960s when he and others sought to create a depersonalized art in which the physical properties of space, scale, and materials were explored as phenomena of interest on their own. Judd’s use of color in three print series dating from 1988 to 1993 are on view along with a recent acquisition, Untitled (1993). Judd’s prints are compared and contrasted with prints by his peer, Sol LeWitt.

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Art and Power in the Central African Savanna

June 20, 2009October 11, 2009

This exhibition explores the political and religious power of nearly 60 sculptures created by artists of four Central African cultures: the Luba, Songye, Chokwe, and Luluwa. Carved primarily from wood, these power figures act as containers for magical organic ingredients and serve purposes both religious and political. According to traditional beliefs, the figures mediate between the human and spirit worlds to insure a healthy birth, successful hunt, or triumph over an enemy. A fully-illustrated catalogue by leading expert Constantine Pedridis accompanies the exhibition.

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Permission to Photograph, Copy or Sketch at the de Young or the Legion of Honor

Photography 

  • Photography is allowed in the permanent galleries without flash, artificial light and hand-held only, during public hours. Objects that are on loan or in a special exhibition cannot be photographed. Loan items have a “T” or “L” before the accession number. 
  • The Marketing Department handles requests for commercial photography and filming.

Japanesque: The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism

October 16, 2010January 9, 2011

The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism introduces audiences to the development of the Japanese print over two centuries (1700–1900) and reveals its profound influence on Western art during the era of Impressionism. This exhibition complements the de Young Museum’s presentations of paintings from the Musée d'Orsay, many of which are aesthetically indebted to concepts of Japanese art.

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Left: Hiroshige, Gion Shrine in the Snow (Gionsha setchu), from the series Famous Places in Kyoto (Kyoto meisho no uchi), ca. 1833–1834. Right: Henri Riviere, La Tour en construction, vue de Trocadero, pl. 3 from the book Les Trente-Six Vues de la Tour Eiffel, 1902. Color lithograph © 2010 ARS, New York / ADAGP, Paris

Impressionist Paris: City of Light

June 5, 2010September 26, 2010

La ville lumière—“the City of Light”: Paris earned this nickname during the 19th century with the proliferation of gas lamps that lit up the French capital, turning night into day and boosting its economic vitality. Moreover, the radiance of the metropolis transcended the glow of its streetlights as Paris ascended to its role as the cultural capital of Europe. Authors, composers, and especially visual artists—painters, sculptors, printmakers, and photographers—thrived in this dazzling setting.

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Presenting Sponsor
Bank of the West

Lead Sponsor
Boucheron - Paris

Additional support provided by GOODBYES.

Impressionist Paris: City of Light
Left: Georges Seurat (1859–1891) Eiffel Tower, ca. 1889. Oil on panel. Center: Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Mary Cassatt at the Louvre: The Etruscan Gallery, 1879–1880. Aquatint, drypoint, soft-ground etching, and etching with burnishing. Right: Charles Marville (1816–1879), Street Lamp, 8 Place de l'Opera, ca. 1870–1879. Albumen silver print from wet-collodion-on-glass negative

Kenneth Patchen: Painted Books and Picture-Poems

November 21, 2009March 21, 2010

Already an established writer known for his pacifist sympathies and the 1941 anti-war novel Journal of Albion Moonlight, Kenneth Patchen (1911–1972) and his wife, Miriam, settled in the Telegraph Hill neighborhood of San Francisco in 1950. They became friendly with Lawrence Ferlinghetti, founder of the City Lights publishing company and bookstore and Patchen became a contributor to Ferlinghetti’s Pocket Poets series.

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The Little Bug Angel from A Surprise for the Bagpipe Player, 1955.

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