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Docent Lecture:" Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne, and Beyond," Ellen Harden

December 12, 2010 - 1:00pm

From the late works of Monet and Renoir to the modern masters Cézanne, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Van Gogh and the unique styles of Seurat and Rousseau, these 120 paintings from the Musée d’Orsay continue the story of Impressionism and the artists who responded to and reacted against it. 

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Ticket Donations from the de Young and the Legion of Honor

Each year the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (de Young and Legion of Honor) receives hundreds of requests for ticket donations to support fundraising efforts by non-profit organizations in the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

Ticket donations will operate as follows: Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco will donate four (4) complimentary general admission tickets upon request to each non-profit organization [501(c)(3)] that directly benefits children’s education.

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Japanesque: The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism

October 16, 2010January 9, 2011

The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism introduces audiences to the development of the Japanese print over two centuries (1700–1900) and reveals its profound influence on Western art during the era of Impressionism. This exhibition complements the de Young Museum’s presentations of paintings from the Musée d'Orsay, many of which are aesthetically indebted to concepts of Japanese art.

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Left: Hiroshige, Gion Shrine in the Snow (Gionsha setchu), from the series Famous Places in Kyoto (Kyoto meisho no uchi), ca. 1833–1834. Right: Henri Riviere, La Tour en construction, vue de Trocadero, pl. 3 from the book Les Trente-Six Vues de la Tour Eiffel, 1902. Color lithograph © 2010 ARS, New York / ADAGP, Paris

Impressionist Paris: City of Light

June 5, 2010September 26, 2010

La ville lumière—“the City of Light”: Paris earned this nickname during the 19th century with the proliferation of gas lamps that lit up the French capital, turning night into day and boosting its economic vitality. Moreover, the radiance of the metropolis transcended the glow of its streetlights as Paris ascended to its role as the cultural capital of Europe. Authors, composers, and especially visual artists—painters, sculptors, printmakers, and photographers—thrived in this dazzling setting.

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Presenting Sponsor
Bank of the West

Lead Sponsor
Boucheron - Paris

Additional support provided by GOODBYES.

Impressionist Paris: City of Light
Left: Georges Seurat (1859–1891) Eiffel Tower, ca. 1889. Oil on panel. Center: Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Mary Cassatt at the Louvre: The Etruscan Gallery, 1879–1880. Aquatint, drypoint, soft-ground etching, and etching with burnishing. Right: Charles Marville (1816–1879), Street Lamp, 8 Place de l'Opera, ca. 1870–1879. Albumen silver print from wet-collodion-on-glass negative

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