deYoung

Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt: Conceptual Color in Print

October 17, 2009March 7, 2010

Donald Judd was a major figure in the Minimalist art movement in the 1960s when he and others sought to create a depersonalized art in which the physical properties of space, scale, and materials were explored as phenomena of interest on their own. Judd’s use of color in three print series dating from 1988 to 1993 are on view along with a recent acquisition, Untitled (1993). Judd’s prints are compared and contrasted with prints by his peer, Sol LeWitt.

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Art and Power in the Central African Savanna

June 20, 2009October 11, 2009

This exhibition explores the political and religious power of nearly 60 sculptures created by artists of four Central African cultures: the Luba, Songye, Chokwe, and Luluwa. Carved primarily from wood, these power figures act as containers for magical organic ingredients and serve purposes both religious and political. According to traditional beliefs, the figures mediate between the human and spirit worlds to insure a healthy birth, successful hunt, or triumph over an enemy. A fully-illustrated catalogue by leading expert Constantine Pedridis accompanies the exhibition.

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de Young History

The de Young Museum originated as the Fine Arts Building, which was constructed in Golden Gate Park for the California Midwinter International Exposition in 1894. The chair of the exposition organizing committee was Michael H. de Young, co-founder of the San Francisco Chronicle. The Fine Arts Building was designed in a pseudo–Egyptian Revival style and decoratively adorned with images of Hathor, the cow goddess. Following the exposition, the building was designated as a museum for the people of San Francisco.

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La Maternité

Joan Miró (1893–1983)
La Maternité, 1973
Bronze
Museum purchase, gift of Bernard and Barbro Osher
2006.1

Although Miró never formally joined the European Surrealists, like that group of artists he drew inspiration from the spatial innovations of Cubism, the Dada movement’s embrace of the irrational, and the psychological theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung regarding unconscious thought and collective archetypes.

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