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Stella!!!

Visitors to Gallery 14 at the de Young immediately encounter the riot of geometric color that is Frank Stella’s impressive 12-foot-square painting, Lettre sur les aveugles II (1974). This vibrant work was the first of Stella’s paintings to enter the permanent collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

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Meet Max Hollein

On June 1, Max Hollein became the new director of the Fine Arts Museums. Born in Vienna, Max comes to us most recently from Frankfurt, where he directed the Schirn Kunsthalle (since 2001), as well as the Städel Museum and the Liebieghaus Sculpture Collection (both since 2006). Max studied art history at the University of Vienna and business administration at the Vienna University of Economics and began his career at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. We asked members to send their own questions to ask our new director.

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Looking Into Our American Chairs

When we think of X-rays, we immediately think of images of our bodies. We know that X-rays can reveal a broken bone for example, but they can also give us information about what is happening inside inanimate objects.

Chairs are particularly interesting because, unlike static furniture like tables and cabinets, they must submit to stress from all directions: they are sat on, rocked back and forth, picked up, and dragged around. This portability has led to many different solutions for joints that we often cannot see from the outside.

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Housekeeping: The Thinker

Geneva Griswold, the former Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation, talked with us about how she and her colleagues keep Auguste Rodin’s sculpture The Thinker looking its very best. 

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Kay Sekimachi’s Guestbook

Visitors to the 2016 exhibition Kay Sekimachi: Student, Teacher, Artist were encouraged to sign a guestbook, leaving notes for the artist which were affixed in a journal for her archives. 

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Using the Tools of the Future to Support the Past

Museum conservators recently used 3D printing to build a custom cradle to hold the intricate interior of an 18th-century French clock as it underwent conservation.

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